Posts filed under ‘Observation’

Hold The Applause

We agree it’s important to find a permanent solution to the physician payment formula (“Sustainable Growth Rate” or SGR), but the Bill passed by the House of Representatives today is not the answer. It isn’t balanced. It asks too much from beneficiaries without providing enough in return. It asks nothing from pharmaceutical or insurance companies. It continues the ever-increasing privatization of Medicare by increasing costs for beneficiaries for traditional Medicare and Medigap plans. It adds unnecessary costs for the Medicare program and taxpayers.

Of the portion of the SGR costs that will be off set, roughly half (approximately $35 billion of the total $70 billion over 10 years) would come from Medicare beneficiaries through changes that will increase their out-of-pocket costs for health care, including:
• Adding deductibles to Medigap plans purchased by new Medicare beneficiaries starting in 2020;
• Further means-testing premiums for higher-income beneficiaries; and
• Overall increases in Part B premiums.

While the SGR package would make the low-income, Qualified Individual (QI), program permanent, which we strongly support, and would minimally increase and temporarily extend important funding for beneficiary education and outreach, it does not address other key issues that serve as barriers to care. For example, instead of repealing the annual outpatient therapy caps, the process to seek an exception to the cap is extended for another two years. Instead of addressing hospital Observation Status, the Bill further extends enforcement of the so-called “two-midnight” rule.

In short, Medicare beneficiaries would pay too much, with too little in return. Major drug and insurance industries pay nothing, and stand to gain a great deal. As the SGR debate moves to the Senate, we hope further balance and improvements for beneficiaries will be made.

March 26, 2015 at 9:22 pm Leave a comment

CMS Continues to Insist Hospital INpatients are OutPatients

When it wrote the Medicare law, Congress called Medicare Part A “Hospital Insurance” and Part B “Supplemental Medical Insurance.”  Part A is intended to pay for inpatient hospital care.  It is a charade to consider people who stay IN the hospital for more than 24 hours “outpatients,” and pay for their care under Part B. This not only conflicts with the Medicare law and Congressional intent, it also harms the older and disabled people – and their families – who depend upon Medicare and for whom the law was written. They lose their right to Part A hospital coverage, are often left with hospital bills they would not have if they were properly admitted, and completely lose their ability to obtain Medicare coverage for post-hospital nursing home care.  CMS’s insistence on continuing this policy places hospital payment mechanisms over the interests and rights of older and disabled people.

July 12, 2013 at 6:55 pm 1 comment

You’re not in the hospital. You’re in observation!

When Mrs. Lee Barrows was told that her husband Larry, whom she’d been visiting in the hospital for a week was not an in-patient, she asked, then “Who the hell have I been visiting?”  This scene in Connecticut is being repeated daily in acute care hospitals all over the country.  Medicare beneficiaries – although placed in hospital beds (often, from the emergency room) and given medications, tests, therapies, medical and nursing services, food, and a wrist-band – are told they aren’t in-patients; they’re just receiving observation services as outpatients.  Patients often learn about their out-patient status just as they are leaving the hospital for the skilled nursing facility – which won’t be covered by the Medicare program because they weren’t in-patients for three consecutive days! 

The Center for Medicare Advocacy has been hearing this story with increasing frequency over the last year.  We’ve been writing about it (see our 5/24 post), and now, the media is reporting on it.

Bloomberg News published an article by Drew Armstrong on its website and in Business Week – “Medicare Fraud Effort Gives Elderly Surprise Hospital Bills” (July 12, 2010), http://www.bloomberg.com/news/print/2010-07-12/hospital-fraud-audits-spur-unintended-cash-penalty-to-elderly-on-medicare.html

The Philadelphia Inquirer also addressed this pressing issue in its article “High cost, rigorous rules can trap Medicare patients” (July 4, 2010), http://www.philly.com/inquirer/health_science/daily/20100704_High_cost__rigorous_rules_can_trap_Medicare_patients.html

The Center has lots of information on this issue.  Please go to http://www.medicareadvocacy.org/InfoByTopic/ObservationStatus/ObservationMain.htm

And let us hear from you, too!  What is happening to you and your friends and relatives in the hospital?

July 13, 2010 at 7:45 pm 2 comments


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